Friday, July 19, 2019
Home Emotional aspects of sexuality Vaginal intercourse How we know that the vagina is not a sex organ

How we know that the vagina is not a sex organ

Orgasm is a primitive and fundamental response because male orgasm (as the trigger for ejaculation) is essential for human reproduction. The male response involves the brain (which responds to erotic stimuli by increasing the blood flow in the genitals) and the penis. The penis and the clitoris develop from the same genital tubercle in the foetus. They are equivalent organs. Women are only capable of orgasm because they have a phallus.

The ducts that form the vagina in a female foetus waste away in the male. If the vagina was a sex organ, women would have had to have evolved a completely different mechanism (separately from the male) for responding erotically. We only evolve functionality for reproductive or survival reasons.

If women had orgasms from inserting objects (such as an erect penis) into the vagina they would seek this kind of stimulation themselves. Yet research has clearly identified the clitoris as the focus for female masturbation. The hymen is a small flap of skin that covers the entrance to the vagina (in most but not all women). When the hymen is broken there may be a little blood and some discomfort. Before the days of tampons, women’s hymens were broken the first time they engaged in intercourse. This is clear evidence that women did not masturbate by inserting objects into the vagina. In modern times when women use tampons to absorb their menstrual blood, they do not obtain sexual pleasure from inserting tampons into their vaginas.

The anatomical evidence for the clitoris is indisputable. Rather than abandon the vagina as a possible source for female orgasm, the clitoris has simply been added as an additional piece of relatively minor anatomy that may assist with arousal for some women. The determination to believe that the vagina should have a role in female orgasm, means that even today people assume that women can orgasm by two quite different routes. So although men clearly have only one sex organ, it is assumed that women have two. This is a nonsensical concept to any rationally minded person.

Anatomy such as the vagina, which is essentially a cavity, could never be a sex organ. A cavity can always be penetrated. No body orifice (including the mouth, anus and vagina) can be a sex organ. There is no point at which further stimulation becomes undesirable as well as pointless. This is the clearest anatomical evidence that the vagina could never be a sex organ.

Intercourse involves the penis (a phallus) entering the vagina (a cavity). There is limited opportunity for the penis to stimulate the vagina in any way because it is relatively long and thin while the vagina is like the inside of a balloon. The only possibility is that the penis jabs or pokes at the walls of the vagina. This is not the correct kind of stimulation to cause orgasm. Stimulation needs to massage the blood-flow within the erectile organ.

There is no requirement for someone who is the receiver of an erect penis to be aroused. The receiver offers a body orifice for a penetrating male to ejaculate into. The mouth is the most sensitive of all body orifices but men know that giving oral sex cannot not cause orgasm. They probably also know that being a receiver of anal intercourse does not cause orgasm. It is only female anatomy (such as the breasts and vagina) that are ascribed an imaginary sensitivity. Research indicates that only the outermost portion (entrance) of the vagina and rectum has any sensitivity. Women never contest these myths because of their general embarrassment over sex, their uncertainty over their own arousal and their desire to please men sexually.

A cavity is made to hold something. In the case of the rectum, it is faeces. In the case of the vagina, it’s semen. Neither of these organs is erectile. It is the flow of blood into the penis that makes orgasm possible. It is the flow of blood into the clitoral organ that motivates women to masturbate.

The vagina evolved from primitive egg ducts. Vagina is part of the birth canal and (like all internal organs) has little sensitivity. We only have sensitivity in our anatomy to protect our bodies from external injury. The intense climaxes women report during childbirth come from physical peaks as the baby’s head breaching the vaginal entrance. This sensation can be replicated by the hand (vaginal fisting) but not the penis (regardless of size).

When asked about the anatomy involved in female orgasm, women will often imply that it is a specialist topic that only sexologists can comment on. The sensations of intercourse are vague and diffuse. So the anatomy involved in the orgasms women think they have could be attributed to anatomy anywhere within the pelvis. More informed women choose either the vagina or the clitoris as the source of the orgasms they think they have.

Most women are unresponsive and so they don’t appreciate that orgasm is achieved by stimulating specific anatomy. To a responsive woman, it is just as obvious that the clitoris is the source of her orgasm as it is to a man that the penis is the source of his. Mental arousal that arises from focusing on specific erotic concepts, indicates to us the anatomy that needs to be stimulated. Anyone who has ever been aroused can identify their sex organ.

There is, however, no evidence that the vagina is ever the sole source of arousal, or even the primary source of erotic arousal in any female. (Alfred Kinsey 1953)