Friday, July 19, 2019
Home Intellectual aspects of sexuality How orgasm is achieved Orgasm is a one-off sexual release that is innate

Orgasm is a one-off sexual release that is innate

Responsiveness is the ability to respond to an erotic trigger (an erotic thought or a visual stimulus). We are each born with an ability to respond to erotic stimuli to varying degrees. If we are responsive (most men but only a few women), our mind responds to erotic stimuli. We do not choose to be responsive or unresponsive. It is just the way we are. Orgasm is a response of the mind and body that we cannot control consciously. Orgasm arises as a subconscious response when the correct stimuli are present.

Orgasm involves the brain, the central nervous system, the genitals and the whole body. Initially a sex organ is unaroused. The penis is flaccid and a woman is unaware of any sensitivity in her pelvic region. As the mind responds to eroticism, messages from the brain via the central nervous system that build tension as blood flows to the sex organ (penis or clitoris). In men this results in an erection and a strong urge to engage in intercourse.

Once a person is conscious of their arousal, they may be motivated to stimulate their sex organ (penis or clitoris). A person learns from experience that if they massage their sex organ when aroused, it is usually possible to orgasm. A person focuses their mind on some aspect of eroticism that they know has caused them to become aroused in the past. Arousal is biological (automatic) for a younger man. Women have to generate sufficient arousal for orgasm by making conscious effort to focus on explicitly erotic scenarios.

As our mind responds to eroticism, blood flows into the corpora cavernosa within the sex organ. The corpora cavernosa are within the shaft of the penis and inside the body of the internal clitoral organ. We gradually become conscious of this physical arousal (tumescence). But the evidence and sensations of physical arousal are much stronger for men than for women.

For a fifth of men (22%) orgasm is primarily a genital reaction while nearly half of men (45%) have some build-up (body tension). The remaining four variations are similar to the first two but can include additional trembling, fainting, frenzied movements, convulsions, collapse, laughter and talking. Female arousal is muted compared with male arousal that leads quickly and easily to orgasm. Female orgasm is also less dramatic and much less intense.

Both sexes use a squeeze technique to massage the corpora cavernosa within the phallus. This massaging motion is continued rhythmically up until orgasm. Manual stimulation of the sex organ is combined with a tensing of the buttock muscles to pressure the internal organ from behind. The whole body tenses and the mind focuses on achieving orgasm. Orgasm involves a release of tension that is built up as a person becomes aroused.

Muscular tensions in the pelvic region increase, culminating in a peak that is abruptly dissipated (providing a sense of release). Heightened arousal causes a person to lose full consciousness of their surroundings. Orgasm is felt as pelvic contractions and a release of sexual emotions in the brain. Orgasm involves the sporadic contractions of muscles, the ejaculation of semen (men only as there is no equivalent female sensation) and the sensation of blood (accumulated in the genitals) flowing away from the area.

After orgasm there is a sense of release and relaxation as the blood flows away from the penis and vulva. Men fall asleep after the exertions of intercourse. Women masturbate as a way of falling asleep. An orgasm is a release of sexual energy. Following sexual release, we feel sated. We have a similar feeling after eating a big meal but especially if we were very hungry beforehand. We also feel sleepy after a heavy meal. The effect is stronger for men because male orgasm is considerably stronger than female orgasm.

After orgasm, the sex organ (penis or clitoris) cannot easily return to an aroused state. Typically an orgasm is followed by a period of resolution before another one is possible. Some highly responsive young boys can attempt a number of orgasms sequentially with little rest in between. For adults, most of the time, there is a period of at least a few hours before the individual is receptive to being aroused again. In responsive women, this period may extend for weeks. Female sexual tension builds subconsciously.

We have no conscious control over orgasm. We cannot make ourselves orgasm. We can only focus on erotic concepts and stimulate ourselves until first our mind and then our body responds. It may seem that younger men can be made to orgasm because they are so highly aroused that orgasm can be almost spontaneous. Female responsiveness involves much lower levels of tumescence, mental arousal and orgasm frequency than the male experience. A responsive woman is only aware of clitoral tumescence when masturbating. Even when alone a woman has to cajole her mind and body to respond. This cannot be forced. It will happen only if her body has accumulated enough sexual tension (at a much lower levels than for a man).

Considerable psychiatric therapy can be wasted on persons (especially females) who are misjudged to be cases of repression when, in actuality, at least some of them never were equipped to respond erotically. (Alfred Kinsey 1948)